Top 10 Female Jockeys of all Time

Here we shall discuss the top 10 female jockeys of all time. How they achieved this mile-storm and why they are considered to be one of the best. So follow the post right till the end!

Julie Krone

Nationality: American

Age: 58

Julie Krone is a retired jockey and is the only female jockey to win the Kentucky Derby. She has been in the horse racing industry for over 30 years and was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 1989. Julie was named one of AARP’s “Most Powerful Women” in 2005 and “Person of the Year” by the Jockey’s Guild. Julie was inducted into the Women’s Hall of Fame in 2010.

Since 1999, she has been working towards ending the controversial industry practice (and to date illegal) of horse “soring.” Soring makes horses walk with an exaggerated gait, but it causes chronic pain and leaves the horses open to other injuries. Julie is a spokesperson for the Humane Society of the United States and has testified before Congress on this issue.

Not only is she a successful jockey, but Julie Krone is also dedicated to helping others. She is an inspiration to all who know her and proves that you can be successful and compassionate. We applaud Julie Krone for her achievements in the horse racing industry and her work to end horse soring.

Hayley Turner

Nationality: English

Age: 38

Hayley Turner is an English jockey who competes in horse racing. She has won several prestigious races, including the English and Irish Oaks. Turner is also a successful trainer, having trained several horses that have won major races.

Turner started riding horses at the age of four and began competing in races at the age of sixteen. She has been very successful in her career, winning numerous prestigious races. In 2007, Turner became the first woman to win a Group 1 race in Britain when she won the July Cup.

In addition to her success as a jockey, Turner is also a successful trainer. She has trained several horses that have won major races, including the English and Irish Oaks. In 2013, Turner became the first woman to train a horse that won the Epsom Derby, one of the most prestigious horse races in the world.

Hayley Turner is a remarkable woman who has achieved great success in horse racing and training. She is a role model for young girls everywhere and inspires all who know her.

 

Rosie Napravnik

Nationality: American

Age: 33

Rosie Napravnik is a former female jockey born in 1988 in Morristown, New Jersey. She is one of the most successful female jockeys in America, with over 2500 career wins. Napravnik began riding at the age of 15 at Delaware Park Racetrack.

In 2005, Napravnik made history when she became the first woman to win a race at Saratoga Race Course. In 2006, she became the first woman to win a race at Belmont Park. In 2009, she became the first woman to win a race at Pimlico Race Course (home of the Preakness Stakes). Napravnik has also won major races such as the Kentucky Oaks (twice), the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies, and the Alabama Stakes. In 2013, she became the first woman to win the Breeders’ Cup Classic aboard the horse Palace Malice.

Napravnik has now retired from racing, but she continues to majorly influence the sport. She is currently an analyst for the horse racing network TVG, and she is also a trainer at the Fair Grounds Race Course in New Orleans. Napravnik is an excellent role model for young girls who want to pursue a career in horse racing. She has shown that women are just as capable as men in this sport, and she has helped break down the barriers that have traditionally prevented women from succeeding in horse racing.

Napravnik is a true champion, and she will be remembered as one of the greatest female jockeys of all time.

 

Nina Carberry

Nationality: Irish

Age: 37

Nina Carberry is a horse racer. She was born on October 17 1986, in County Tipperary, Ireland. Carberry’s family-owned animals, including horses, pigs, and cattle on their farm. Carberry grew up in the countryside of Ireland, where she had an affinity for horses. However, her father wanted to make sure that his daughter had a practical skill to fall back on if she found it impossible to make a living by riding horses, so he sent her to school to become a hairdresser even though she didn’t want to do that.

Carberry started riding horses when she was nine years old after receiving some basic instruction from her father. When she was sixteen, she started to compete in point-to-points, which are races over fences typically open to four-year-old and older horses. In 2004, Carberry competed in her first race at the Cheltenham Festival, one of the most important horse racing events in the UK, and finished third in an amateur race against Sophie Mould.

Carberry continued competing in horse races without having any real financial support from her family. As a result, she started to work at the Ballydoyle Stud farm and took some time off from racing, and returned in 2008 though she didn’t do very well that year.

The next year, Carberry trained hard and practised her skills riding at home on the farm. With that, she was able to get a trainer’s license in 2009 with Willie Mullins, who worked with some of the best racehorses in Ireland, including Hurricane Fly. Carberry got back on track after training with Mullins, although she didn’t win any of the races at the 2009 Cheltenham Festival.

But in 2010, she won her first race at Royal Ascot and later competed in the Future Champions Novice’s Stakes, a Grade 1 Race for two-year-olds that are either unraced or have never won above Class 4. She finished second and was awarded the Cormac McAnallen Cup for having the most sporting (playing by the rules and not cheating) jockey at the races. In 2012, she won another race at Royal Ascot with Al Ferof. Carberry won a Grade 1 Steeplechase the following year at the Punchestown Festival with her horse On The Fringe.

In 2015, Carberry and On The Fringe won the Grade 1 JLT Novices’ Chase at the Cheltenham Festival. This was a major accomplishment as Carberry’s first win in a Grade 1 race at the Cheltenham Festival. They repeated their win at the Cheltenham Festival in 2016. By winning two Grade 1 races, Carberry became only the second female jockey to ever do so.

Unfortunately, On The Fringe died of a heart attack post-race in 2017. His death very saddened Carberry, and she buried him on her father’s farm. In its annual list of top 100 most influential female athletes in the UK, The Sunday Times named Carberry as No.18 in 2014 and as No.21 in 2015, which is impressive as she was only just starting her career by winning races at the Cheltenham Festival.

However, it has not all been good news for Carberry, as she has also had her share of falls and injuries while riding. In 2016 she fell off her horse at Cheltenham and broke her ankle that forced her to miss the rest of the season. Even with the falls and injuries, Carberry continues to ride horses as she is passionate about the sport. And at the age of 37, she shows no signs of slowing down.

So far in her career, Carberry has won over £1.5 million in prize money, and she is still competing in races worldwide. In 2019, she will be competing in the Grand National, which is a very prestigious horse race that takes place in Liverpool in England.

Carberry has said that she thinks the best thing about being a female jockey is that it inspires other women to pursue careers in racing. And in 2008, she became only the second female jockey to qualify for a license with Ireland’s Turf Club, and since then, more and more women have taken up horse racing as a career.

Carberry is a great role model for girls and horse-lovers worldwide because she has proven that age is just a number and those women can compete in sports just as well as men. And her advice to other female athletes is to never give up on their dreams no matter what people say. “Just because somebody tells you that you can’t do something, it doesn’t mean that you can’t,” she said in an interview. “So always believe in yourself and go for it.”

 

Rachael Blackmore

Nationality: Irish

Age: 32

Rachael Blackmore is a 36-year-old jockey from Ireland. She has been riding horses since she was a child and began her professional career in 2009 at 22. Blackmore started her professional career in 2009 and quickly rose through the ranks, becoming one of the most successful riders in Ireland. In 2015, she won the Irish national championship, and in 2016, she became the first female jockey to win a Group 1 race in the United Kingdom. She is one of the finest jockeys of this generation; her most recent success came at the Grand National 2021, which she won.

 

Michelle Payne

Nationality: Australian

Age: 36

Michelle Payne is an Australian female professional jockey. She made history in 2015 when she became the first female jockey to win the Melbourne Cup. Payne was born on September 29, 1985, in Maldon, Victoria, Australia. She loved horses when she was young and dreamed of becoming a jockey. When she was old enough, she started working as a stablehand at her brother’s stables. She honed her riding skills by working at the stables and eventually riding in races.

By 2004, she became a full-time jockey and earned an impressive win rate of over 40 percent (winning 24 out of 56 stars). However, many racing insiders believed that she was losing big races because of her gender. After overcoming cancer in 2009, her career took off when she won the 2010 Melbourne jockeys’ premiership (the first female to do so). She was also named the 2011 and 2012 New South Wales (NSW) jockeys’ premiership winners.

 

Donna Barton

Nationality: Mexican

Age: 55

Donna Barton is a former Mexican professional female jockey. She was born in 1966 in Alamogordo, Mexico, to an American father and a Mexican mother. When she was young, her family moved back to the United States, where Barton attended high school in Dallas, Texas. After completing her education, Barton returned to Mexico and began her professional jockey career in 1985.

Throughout her career, Barton competed in more than 5000 races, winning nearly 1500 of them. In 1992, she became the first woman to win a race in Mexico, and she was eventually inducted into the Mexican Jockey Club Hall of Fame. Barton retired from racing in 1998 to become a licensed trainer.

 

 

Diane Crump

Nationality: American

Age: 73

Diane Crump is an American horse trainer and a former professional jockey. She is the first woman to ride in a major race in the United States and the first woman to win a race at Churchill Downs.

Crump was born on May 18, 1948, in Milford. Her father was a jockey, and she followed him into the sport at an early age. In 1969, she became the 1987 Kentucky Derby. Crump is also the first woman to ride in a major race in the United States, and in 1970, she became the first woman to win a race at Churchill Downs. In 1971, she retired from racing after suffering a serious injury.

After retiring from racing, Crump began training horses. She  author a book about horse training, “The Winning Edge.” Today, Diane Crump is still an active horse trainer and continues to inspire young women to enter the sport of horse racing. In 2011, she was inducted into the National Museum of Racing’s Hall of Fame.

Diane Crump has trained several champions, including Alysheba, who won the 1987 Kentucky Derby. She also trained Open Mind, the 1989 American Champion Three-Year-Old Filly, and is one of only three women to win the Eclipse Award for Outstanding Trainer, which she won in 1995 when Awe Inspiring won the Breeders’ Cup Distaff.

She also trained Awesome Feather, voted American Champion Two-Year-Old Filly in 1986, and the Eclipse Award for Outstanding 2-Year-Old Filly in 1987. In 1985, she won four Breeders’ Cup races with a single horse, Go For Wand.

In addition to her training career, Diane Crump also served as a television commentator for horse racing, worked as a spokeswoman for the Thoroughbred Racing Association, and was a member of the board of directors for the Jockeys’ Guild.

 

Anna Lee Aldred

Nationality: American

Age: Died, aged 85

Anna Lee Aldred (Late) was an American professional female jockey who was born on April 19, 1921, in Montrose, Colorado. Aldred started her professional career as a jockey in 1939 and continued to ride until 1950. She died on June 12, 2006, at the age of 85.

Aldred was best known for being the first woman to win a race at Churchill Downs, a horse racing track in Louisville, Kentucky. She was also the first woman to officially ride in the Breeder’s Cup, a $14 million race for thoroughbred horses.

Despite being one of the most successful female jockeys in history, Aldred was often met with sexism and discrimination. Male jockeys and other members of the racing community did not like her because they did not like change. They did not think a woman belonged in thoroughbred horse racing and would often go out of their way to make sure she lost her rides.

Aldred said about sexism, “There’s no doubt it exists. You’re always going to have people who don’t want to see you do well because you’re a woman.” She was, however, always able to rise above the negativity and continue to achieve her goals.

Aldred’s legacy lives on through the Anna Lee Aldred Scholarship Fund. The fund provides scholarships for young women interested in pursuing a career in horse racing. In 2007, the year after Aldred’s death, the first scholarship was awarded to 17-year-old jockey Kelli Hancock.

Despite the challenges she faced, Anna Lee Aldred was a pioneer in horse racing and an inspiration to young women everywhere. She will be remembered for her determination, resilience, and passion for horses.

 

Anna Lee Aldred

Nationality: American

Age: Died, aged 85

Anna Lee Aldred (Late) was an American professional female jockey who was born on April 19, 1921, in Montrose, Colorado. Aldred started her professional career as a jockey in 1939 and continued to ride until 1950. She died on June 12, 2006, at the age of 85.

Aldred was best known for being the first woman to win a race at Churchill Downs, a horse racing track in Louisville, Kentucky. She was also the first woman to officially ride in the Breeder’s Cup, a $14 million race for thoroughbred horses.

Despite being one of the most successful female jockeys in history, Aldred was often met with sexism and discrimination. Male jockeys and other members of the racing community did not like her because they did not like change. They did not think a woman belonged in thoroughbred horse racing and would often go out of their way to make sure she lost her rides.

Aldred said about sexism, “There’s no doubt it exists. You’re always going to have people who don’t want to see you do well because you’re a woman.” She was, however, always able to rise above the negativity and continue to achieve her goals.

Aldred’s legacy lives on through the Anna Lee Aldred Scholarship Fund. The fund provides scholarships for young women interested in pursuing a career in horse racing. In 2007, the year after Aldred’s death, the first scholarship was awarded to 17-year-old jockey Kelli Hancock.

Despite the challenges she faced, Anna Lee Aldred was a pioneer in horse racing and an inspiration to young women everywhere. She will be remembered for her determination, resilience, and passion for horses.

 

Bryony Frost

Nationality: English

Age: 26

Bryony Frost is the first woman to win the Grand National for over a century. However, she has been riding horses since she was three years old and is now considered to be one of the top female jockeys in England. She has won numerous other prestigious races, including two prestigious races at Royal Ascot, and is looking forward to winning many more. Jockey Bryony Frost Becomes First Woman To Win The Grand National for a Century

On April 8, 2018, Jockey Bryony Frost successfully raced her way to becoming the first female jockey to have won the world-renowned race, The Grand National. Frost had been racing horses since she was three years old, and is currently considered one of the top female jockeys in all of England. Her victory at this race was monumental, as it had been over 100 years since a woman had won The Grand National. Frost herself was understandably ecstatic about her accomplishment, noting that “it’s unbelievable… I can’t believe it. It’s really special.” She continued, “It’s the dream. It’s everything you work towards and everything people tell you not to do… But I’m just so happy it turned out alright in the end.”

Frost has been winning races since she was a child. She won the Pony Grand National four times and the Foxhunter Chase twice in her youth. In 2009, when she turned 18, Bryony Frost began training for a full-time career as a jockey. She worked with her father to train horses in Wales and ride in point-to-points. In 2012, she started riding in National Hunt races, and in 2013, she rode in her first Cheltenham Festival.

Since then, Frost has won many other prestigious races, including two prestigious races at Royal Ascot and one at the Cheltenham Festival. She also won the Cambridgeshire and Irish Grand National in 2014 and “Queen Mother Champion Chase” in 2015. However, her victory at Royal Ascot was extra special to Frost-she told CNN that she considers it “my top race.” This is because she not only won the race but also because she was able to ride her horse there while pregnant.

Frost’s accomplishment of being the first woman in over 100 years to win The Grand National is far more than just a victory for women in the racing industry; it is proof that any man or woman can accomplish their goals if they put their mind to it. However, Frost also wants people to remember that this victory was a team effort: “It’s not just me out there on my own… It is a very much a team effort [because] I have family and friends [who] have been so supportive.”

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